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To the Maasai Mara

November 23, 2019

It’s a seven-hour drive southwest to the Maasai Mara, Kenya’s most famous national park, with a good part of the road being rutted dirt. By the time we arrived at the Mara Bush Camp it was already almost dark, but even after the long drive from Nakuru, followed by a game drive in the Mara, we were exhilarated by what we had seen.

We were welcomed by our first leopard (though by no means the last we would follow in the next four days); and by a family of lions who would cross our path almost daily.

The two lionesses seemed to share in caring for their cubs, seven in all. It’s remarkable how these mothers tolerate their babies crawling over and nipping at them.

Our tents at Mara Bush Camp were spacious and comfortable, and we were serenaded to sleep by the snuffling, grunting hippos in their nearby pool. Because the camp is not fenced in, animals are free to roam in; so we were cautioned to call our Maasai warrior escorts whenever we would walk after dark. Our William was draped in a traditional red plaid shuka (blanket) and armed with a spear, a knife and a flashlight. One morning as he was escorting me to the Land Cruiser he stopped to flash his light on a cheetah that was strolling through camp.

Bush Camp Courtyard

We took our meals in the courtyard at the center of camp, and each night at cocktail hour we enjoyed sitting around the bonfire and chatting about our day.

Maasai Mara is home to big cats, and we saw many. Besides the lion family and leopards, cheetahs were everywhere. No one — even Jonathan, Wilson and Piper — had ever seen a leopard sitting on its hind legs, so we were lucky to get the shot!

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As hard as it is to get out before dawn (and breakfast) the rewards are plentiful.

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At the other end of the day, as light was fading, we saw two magnificent young lions — still without their manes — whom Piper said carried all the signs of being the next leaders of the pride. Wilson explained that the lions in the Mara form coalitions to lead their prides, rather than taking down the current elder and fighting each other for supremacy. We saw these boys almost every day.

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Day’s end.

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